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Managing NFS and NIS…..

January 29, 2015

managing nfs and nis

 

 

 

 

 

Recently , I just borrowed a book entitled Managing NFS and NIS from O’reilly Associates – written by Hal Stern. The book is quite impressive for a system administrator or system engineer who deals with NFS and NIS in a LINUX or UNIX operating system. NIS provides a distributed database system for common configuration files. NIS servers manage copies of the database files , and NIS client request information from the servers instead of using their own , local copies of these files. NFS is a distributed filesystem. An NFS server has one or more filesystems that are mounted by NFS clients ; to the NFS clients , the remote disks look like local disks.

NFS achieves the first level of transparency by defining a generic set of filesystem operations that are performed on a Virtual File System (VFS). The second level comes from the definition of virtual nodes, which are related to the more familiar Unix filesystem inode structures but hide the actual structure of the physical filesystem beneath them. The set of all procedures that can be performed on files is the vnode interface definition. The vnode and VFS specifications together define the NFS protocol. The Virtual File System allows a client system to access many different types of filesystems
as if they were all attached locally. VFS hides the differences in implementations under a consistent interface. On a Unix NFS client, the VFS interface makes all NFS filesystems look like Unix filesystems, even if they are exported from IBM MVS or Windows NT servers. The VFS interface is really nothing more than a switchboard for filesystem-and file-oriented operations.NFS is an RPC-based protocol, with a client-server relationship between the machine having the filesystem to be distributed and the machine wanting access to that filesystem. NFS kernel server threads run on the server and accept RPC calls from clients. These server threads are initiated by an nfsd daemon. NFS servers also run the mountd daemon to handle filesystem mount requests and some pathname translation. On an NFS client, asynchronous I/O threads (async threads) are usually run to improve NFS performance, but they are not required.

Each version of the NFS RPC protocol contains several procedures, each of which operates on either a file or a filesystem object. The basic procedures performed on an NFS server can be grouped into directory operations, file operations, link operations, and filesystem operations. Directory operations include mkdir and rmdir, which create and destroy directories like their Unix system call equivalents. readdir reads a directory, using an opaque directory pointer to perform sequential reads of the same directory. Other directory-oriented procedures are rename and remove, which operate on entries in a directory the same way the mv and rm commands do. create makes a new directory entry for a file.The NFS protocol is stateless, meaning that there is no need to maintain information about the protocol on the server. The client keeps track of all information required to send requests to the server, but the server has no information about previous NFS requests, or how various NFS requests relate to each other. Remember the differences between the TCP and UDP protocols: UDP is a stateless protocol that can lose packets or deliver them out of order; TCP is a stateful protocol that guarantees that packets arrive and are delivered in order. The hosts using TCP must remember connection state information to recognize when part of a transmission was lost.

NFS RPC requests are sent from a client to the server one at a time. A single client process will not issue another RPC call until the call in progress completes and has been acknowledged by the NFS server. In this respect NFS RPC calls are like system calls — a process cannot continue with the next system call until the current one completes. A single client host may have several RPC calls in progress at any time, coming from several processes, but each process ensures that its file operations are well ordered by waiting for their acknowledgements. Using the NFS async threads makes this a little more complicated, but for now it’s helpful to think of each process sending a stream of NFS requests, one at a time.

Lastly , managing NFS and NIS filesystem is quite a bit complicated task to do it. The system administrator or system engineer have to be very careful in designing the network file system. PC/NFS is used as a client-only implementation running the DOS operating system. There are also mail services that we can centralized using NFS and NIS. Overall , the book – Managing NFS and NIS is a good book to read…

p/s:- Some of the article are taken from the excerpt – Managing NFS and NIS – O’reilly Associates writen by Hal Stern.

 

 

 

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